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woman, 75, found guilty in brother's death

Thursday, September 21, 2017 15:01 PM
Written by Stan Maddux
Category: Local News

A LaPorte jury Wednesday night found a 75-year old woman guilty of not seeknig medical attention for her badly beaten legally blind brother who a week later died.

Georgia Arvidson was convicted of level 3 felony neglect of a dependent.

The LaPorte Circuit Court jury deliberated for less than three hours.

She could face anywhere from 3 to 16 years at sentencing set by Judge Tom Alevizos for November 16.

Harold Grise, 68, had his face practically shattered and jaw fractured allegedly by his nephew, Erik Minter, inside the victim's Fish Lake area home in October of 2015.

The 45-year old Minter and Arvidson drove up from Texas to visit Grise, something the brother and his sister did every year and took turns doing the traveling.

Accoridng to authorities, Minter after drinking heavily became obnoxious and Grise from his chair grabbed him by the throat hard enough to restrict his airway.

Minter retaliated with two hard punches to his uncle's face.

LaPorte County deputy prosecutor Julianne Havens said Grise already legally blind and using a walker prior to having his face ''smashed in'' legally became Arvidson's dependent once she began providing him with care.

She failed in her responsibility as a dependent, though, by failing to seek professional help for her brother who never got up off the floor and was unresponsive for much of the three days he spent badly injured inside his home, she said.

Grise was cleaned and given pillows, soft food and liquids and other things like aspirin but despite his condition marked by eyes swollen shut and a purple face worsening no calls for help were ever placed, Havens said.

''She ignored what was needed,'' said Havens.

Medics didn't arrive until the victim's son unable to contact his father drove to his residence from Westville and through a window spotted his severely hurt father on the floor.

Grise died four days later.

Defense attorney Steve Snyder said he agreed medical help should have been sought but said Arvidson was placed in that situation by her son and did the right thing by caring for him even after being told by Grise not to call 911 on at least two occasions.

He said she only did what was typical for women of her generation and that's doing as men in the home say.

Snyder also said it was the injuries that caused Grise to die, not the delay in medical care.

''This entire prosecution is misguided from start to finish,'' he said.

Minter will go to trial later if a gullty plea is not reached in his case, said Havens.